Description

Achalasia is a rare disorder that makes it difficult for food and liquid to pass into your stomach. Achalasia occurs when nerves in the tube connecting your mouth and stomach (esophagus) become damaged. As a result, the esophagus loses the ability to squeeze food down, and the muscular valve between the esophagus and stomach (lower esophageal sphincter) doesn't fully relax — making it difficult for food to pass into your stomach.There's no cure for achalasia. But symptoms can usually be managed with minimally invasive therapy or surgery.Achalasia care at Mayo ClinicOverviewDiagnosis & treatmentRequest an appointmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesExpertise & rankingsLocations, travel & lodgingClinical trialsResearchCosts & insuranceRequest an appointmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesExpertise & rankingsLocations, travel & lodgingClinical trialsResearchCosts & insurance

Causes

ClinicalTrials

Below are current clinical trials.4 studies in Achalasia (open studies only).Below are current clinical trials.Filter this list of studies by location, status and more.Rochester, Minn.The purpose of this study is to assess symptoms and quality of life in patients following Heller’s cardiomyotomy for achalasia in the context of a sigmoid esophagus.Rochester, Minn.In this study we will review medical records and questionnaire results of patients that underwent PerOral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM) + Partial Fundoplication (PF) and POEM and Laparoscopic Modified Heller Myotomy + PF for achalasia and access treatment outcomes by reviewing complications such as: delayed bleeding, pneumoperitoneum, pneumothorax, mucosal flap perforation, pneumomediastinum, cervical emphysema and displacement of transparent cap.Rochester, Minn.The objectives of this study are as follows: In patients with primary Type II Achalasia, following a single 5-mg dose of IW-1701, - To assess the safety and tolerability - To determine the effects on measures of esophageal function by high-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM) - To determine the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters, Cmax, Tmax, and AUClastRochester, Minn.The aim of this study is to assess quality of life in patients following esophageal resection for achalasia.OverviewDiagnosis & treatmentRequest an appointmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesExpertise & rankingsLocations, travel & lodgingClinical trialsResearchCosts & insuranceRequest an appointmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesExpertise & rankingsLocations, travel & lodgingClinical trialsResearchCosts & insurance

Complications

Appointment

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.Central Appointment OfficeCentral Appointment OfficeCentral Appointment OfficeCentral Appointment Office(Minnesota)

Diagnosis

Works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.More information about billing and insurance: Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota Mayo Clinic Health SystemOverviewDiagnosis & treatmentRequest an appointmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesExpertise & rankingsLocations, travel & lodgingClinical trialsResearchCosts & insuranceRequest an appointmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesExpertise & rankingsLocations, travel & lodgingClinical trialsResearchCosts & insurance

Experience

Research

RiskFactors

Speciality

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States, with campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Staff skilled in dozens of specialties work together to ensure quality care and successful recovery. Gastroenterology and Hepatology OverviewDiagnosis & treatmentRequest an appointmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesExpertise & rankingsLocations, travel & lodgingClinical trialsResearchCosts & insuranceRequest an appointmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesExpertise & rankingsLocations, travel & lodgingClinical trialsResearchCosts & insurance

Symptoms

SymptomsAndCauses

Treatment

Achalasia treatment focuses on relaxing or forcing open the lower esophageal sphincter so that food and liquid can move more easily through your digestive tract.Specific treatment depends on your age and the severity of the condition.Nonsurgical options include: Pneumatic dilation. A balloon is inserted into the esophageal sphincter and inflated to enlarge the opening. This outpatient procedure may need to be repeated if the esophageal sphincter doesn't stay open. Nearly one-third of people treated with balloon dilation need repeat treatment within six years. Botox (botulinum toxin type A). This muscle relaxant can be injected directly into the esophageal sphincter with an endoscope. The injections may need to be repeated, and repeat injections may make it more difficult to perform surgery later if needed. Botox is generally recommended only for people who aren't good candidates for pneumatic dilation or surgery due to age or overall health. Medication. Your doctor might suggest muscle relaxants such as nitroglycerin (Nitrostat) or nifedipine (Procardia) before eating. These medications have limited treatment effect and severe side effects. Medications are generally considered only if you're not a candidate for pneumatic dilation or surgery, and Botox hasn't helped. Surgery may be recommended for younger people because nonsurgical treatment tends to be less effective in this group. Surgical options include: Heller myotomy. The surgeon cuts the muscle at the lower end of the esophageal sphincter to allow food to pass more easily into the stomach. The procedure can be done noninvasively (laparoscopic Heller myotomy). People who have a Heller myotomy may later develop gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Fundoplication. The surgeon wraps the top of your stomach around the lower esophageal sphincter, to tighten the muscle and prevent acid reflux. Fundoplication might be performed at the same time as Heller myotomy, to avoid future problems with acid reflux. Fundoplication is usually done with a minimally invasive (laparoscopic) procedure. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The surgeon uses an endoscope inserted through your mouth and down your throat to create an incision in the inside lining of your esophagus. Then, as in a Heller myotomy, the surgeon cuts the muscle at the lower end of the esophageal sphincter. POEM doesn't include an anti-reflux procedure. OverviewDiagnosis & treatmentRequest an appointmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesExpertise & rankingsLocations, travel & lodgingClinical trialsResearchCosts & insuranceRequest an appointmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesExpertise & rankingsLocations, travel & lodgingClinical trialsResearchCosts & insurance