Description

ACL injuryACL injuryThe anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the key ligaments that help stabilize your knee joint. The ACL connects your thighbone (femur) to your shinbone (tibia). It's most commonly torn during sports that involve sudden stops and changes in direction — such as basketball, soccer, tennis and volleyball. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the key ligaments that help stabilize your knee joint. The ACL connects your thighbone (femur) to your shinbone (tibia). It's most commonly torn during sports that involve sudden stops and changes in direction — such as basketball, soccer, tennis and volleyball.An ACL injury is the tearing of the anterior cruciate (KROO-she-ate) ligament (ACL) — one of the major ligaments in your knee. ACL injuries most commonly occur during sports that involve sudden stops, jumping or changes in direction — such as basketball, soccer, football, tennis, downhill skiing, volleyball and gymnastics. Many people hear or feel a "pop" in the knee when an ACL injury occurs. Your knee may swell, feel unstable and become too painful to bear weight.Depending on the severity of your ACL injury, treatment may include rest and rehabilitation exercises to help you regain strength and stability or surgery to replace the torn ligament followed by rehabilitation. A proper training program may help reduce the risk of an ACL injury.Arthroscopic knee surgery5 common sports injuries in young female athletesOveruse injury preventionSymptom CheckerUltrasoundX-rayLeg swellingOverviewSymptoms & causesDiagnosis & treatmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentSelf-managementMore aboutIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews from Mayo ClinicDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews from Mayo Clinic

Causes

ClinicalTrials

Below are current clinical trials.3 studies in ACL injury (open studies only).Below are current clinical trials.Filter this list of studies by location, status and more.Rochester, Minn.Incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures disproportionately affect female athletes at a rate 4-6 times greater than male counterparts. In addition, females have a reinjury rate 16 times that of healthy female controls and 4 times that of male ACL reconstruction (ACLR) counterparts. After ACL injury and throughout rehabilitation, a ubiquitous impairment that limits athlete progression to return to sport (RTS) is atrophy of the musculature surrounding the knee, termed arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI).The focus of the study is to develop an objective, reproducible, and reliable measure of neuromotor activation (directly correlated with AMI) and neuromuscular elicited muscle stiffness for both injury prevention and rehabilitation.Rochester, Minn.The purpose of this study is to see if the inflammation in early stage arthritis can be cessated by changing synoviocyte-macrophage interactions in a way that macrophages do not get activated.Rochester, Minn., Minneapolis, Minn.The purpose of this study is to establish arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI) as a neural mechanism by examining the bilateral neuromotor drive of thigh musculature from AMI progression after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The study will also determine the inhibitory effect of aberrant proprioceptive afferents on quadriceps and hamstring motor output. Furthermore, this study will determine the efficacy of neurofeedback to induce central changes that provide peripheral benefits to muscle activation.Arthroscopic knee surgery5 common sports injuries in young female athletesOveruse injury preventionSymptom CheckerUltrasoundX-rayLeg swellingOverviewSymptoms & causesDiagnosis & treatmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentSelf-managementMore aboutIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews from Mayo ClinicDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews from Mayo Clinic

Complications

Appointment

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.Central Appointment OfficeCentral Appointment OfficeCentral Appointment OfficeCentral Appointment Office(Minnesota)

Diagnosis

The pain and disability associated with an ACL injury prompt many people to seek immediate medical attention. Others may make an appointment with their family doctors. Depending upon the severity of your injury, you may be referred to a doctor specializing in sports medicine or a specialist in bone and joint surgery (orthopedic surgeon).Before an appointment be prepared to answer the following questions? When did the injury occur? What were you doing at the time? Did you hear a loud "pop" or feel a "popping" sensation? Was there much swelling afterward? Have you injured your knee before? Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional? Do any specific movements seem to improve or worsen your symptoms? Does your knee ever "lock" or feel blocked when you're trying to move it? Do you ever feel that your knee is unstable or unable to support your weight? Arthroscopic knee surgery5 common sports injuries in young female athletesOveruse injury preventionSymptom CheckerUltrasoundX-rayLeg swellingOverviewSymptoms & causesDiagnosis & treatmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentSelf-managementMore aboutIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews from Mayo ClinicDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews

Experience

Research

RiskFactors

Speciality

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States, with campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Staff skilled in dozens of specialties work together to ensure quality care and successful recovery. Orthopedic Surgery Orthopedic Surgery Research Arthroscopic knee surgery5 common sports injuries in young female athletesOveruse injury preventionSymptom CheckerUltrasoundX-rayLeg swellingOverviewSymptoms & causesDiagnosis & treatmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentSelf-managementMore aboutIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews from Mayo ClinicDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews from Mayo Clinic

Symptoms

SymptomsAndCauses

Signs and symptoms of an ACL injury usually include: A loud "pop" or a "popping" sensation in the knee Severe pain and inability to continue activity Swelling that begins within a few hours Loss of range of motion A feeling of instability or "giving way" with weight bearing Seek immediate care if any injury to your knee causes signs or symptoms of an ACL injury. The knee joint is a complex structure of bones, ligaments, tendons and other tissues that work together. It's important to get a prompt and accurate diagnosis to determine the severity of the injury and get proper treatment. ACL injuryACL injuryThe anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the key ligaments that help stabilize your knee joint. The ACL connects your thighbone (femur) to your shinbone (tibia). It's most commonly torn during sports that involve sudden stops and changes in direction — such as basketball, soccer, tennis and volleyball. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the key ligaments that help stabilize your knee joint. The ACL connects your thighbone (femur) to your shinbone (tibia). It's most commonly torn during sports that involve sudden stops and changes in direction — such as basketball, soccer, tennis and volleyball.Ligaments are strong bands of tissue that connect one bone to another. The ACL, one of two ligaments that cross in the middle of the knee, connects your thighbone (femur) to your shinbone (tibia) and helps stabilize your knee joint. Most ACL injuries happen during sports and fitness activities that can put stress on the knee: Suddenly slowing down and changing direction (cutting) Pivoting with your foot firmly planted Landing from a jump incorrectly Stopping suddenly Receiving a direct blow to the knee or collision, such as a football tackle When the ligament is damaged, there is usually a partial or complete tear across the tissue. A mild injury may overextend the ligament but leave it intact.Women are more likely to have an ACL injury than are men who participate in the same sports. Studies have suggested some reasons for these differences in risk.In general, women athletes exhibit a strength imbalance in their thighs with the muscles at the front of the thigh (quadriceps) being stronger than the muscles at the back (hamstrings). The hamstrings help prevent the shinbone from moving too far forward — movement that can overextend the ACL.Studies comparing jumping and landing techniques among men and women athletes have shown that women athletes are more likely to land from a jump in a way that increases stress on their knees.Research suggests that training to strengthen muscles of the legs, hips and lower torso — as well as training to improve jumping and landing techniques — may reduce the higher ACL injury risk associated with women athletes.People who experience an ACL injury are at higher risk of developing knee osteoarthritis, in which joint cartilage deteriorates and its smooth surface roughens. Arthritis may occur even if you have surgery to reconstruct the ligament.Multiple factors likely influence the risk of arthritis, such as the severity of the original injury, the presence of related injuries in the knee joint or the level of activity after treatment.Arthroscopic knee surgery5 common sports injuries in young female athletesOveruse injury preventionSymptom CheckerUltrasoundX-rayLeg swellingOverviewSymptoms & causesDiagnosis & treatmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentSelf-managementMore aboutIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews from Mayo ClinicDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews from Mayo Clinic

Treatment

The pain and disability associated with an ACL injury prompt many people to seek immediate medical attention. Others may make an appointment with their family doctors. Depending upon the severity of your injury, you may be referred to a doctor specializing in sports medicine or a specialist in bone and joint surgery (orthopedic surgeon).Before an appointment be prepared to answer the following questions? When did the injury occur? What were you doing at the time? Did you hear a loud "pop" or feel a "popping" sensation? Was there much swelling afterward? Have you injured your knee before? Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional? Do any specific movements seem to improve or worsen your symptoms? Does your knee ever "lock" or feel blocked when you're trying to move it? Do you ever feel that your knee is unstable or unable to support your weight? Arthroscopic knee surgery5 common sports injuries in young female athletesOveruse injury preventionSymptom CheckerUltrasoundX-rayLeg swellingOverviewSymptoms & causesDiagnosis & treatmentDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentSelf-managementMore aboutIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews from Mayo ClinicDiagnosisTreatmentDepartments & specialtiesClinical trialsPreparing for your appointmentRequest an appointmentIn-DepthMultimediaResourcesNews from Mayo Clinic